Australian Patient Safety Foundation

Australian Patient Safety Foundation

The Australian Patient Safety Foundation Inc. (APSF) is a non-profit independent organisation dedicated to the advancement of patient safety.

The APSF has provided leadership in the reduction of harm to patients in all healthcare environments since 1988. Based in Adelaide, South Australia, the APSF works with Commonwealth and State governments, researchers, professional organisations, Colleges, healthcare professionals and consumers at the national and international level to improve outcomes for patients.

Articles & Resources

Learning from incident reports in the Australian medical imaging setting: handover and communication errors

Hannaford, N., Mandel, C., Crock, C., Buckley, K., Magrabi, F., Ong, M. S., et al.

British Journal of Radiology, 86(20120336)

2013

Objective: To determine the type and nature of incidents occurring within medical imaging settings in Australia and identify strategies that could be engaged to reduce the risk of their re-occurrence.

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Using FDA reports to inform a classification for health information technology safety problems

Magrabi, F., Ong, M. S., Runciman, W., & Coiera, E.

Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 19(1), 45-53.

2012

OBJECTIVE: To expand an emerging classification for problems with health information technology (HIT) using reports submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database.

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Tracking and evaluating appropriateness of healthcare delivery

Runciman, W. B.

Patient First Joint International Conference on Quality Assurance and Patient Safety, Pondicherry, India, 28 – 30 November

2012

Specialty specific incident reporting systems in healthcare

Schultz, T. J., & Magrabi, F.

Measuring and Reducing Avoidable Adverse Events. Sydney, 20-21st September.

2012

Is ‘perfect’ the enemy of ‘good’? Safety & Quality in the 21st Century.

Runciman, W. B.

Australasian College of Emergency Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting, The Art and Science of Emergency Medicine, Hobart 19 – 22 November.

2012

Towards the delivery of appropriate healthcare in Australia

Runciman WB, Coiera E, Day RO, Hannaford NA, Hibbert PD, Hunt TD, Westbrook J, Braithwaite J

Med J Aust 197:78-81

2012

A challenging proposal draws on the lessons learnt from the CareTrack study to pave the way towards better health care

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CareTrack: assessing the appropriateness of health care delivery in Australia.

Runciman WB, Hunt TD, Hannaford NA, Hibbert PD, Westbrook J, Coiera E, Day RO, Hindmarsh DM et al

Med J Aust, 197:100-105

2012

Objective: To determine the percentage of health care encounters at which a sample of adult Australians received appropriate care.

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CareTrack: Some Pilot Data

Runciman WB, Hunt T, Hannaford N, Ramanathan S, Schultz T

ISQua 28th International Conference - Hong Kong, 14th-17th September

2011

The International Society for Quality in Health Care (ISQua) is a non-profit, independent organization with members in over 70 countries. ISQua works to provide services to guide health professionals, providers, researchers, agencies, policy makers and consumers to achieve excellence in health-care delivery to all people and to continuously improve the quality and safety of care. Over 1,000 abstracts were submitted with more than 1,900 delegates registered from 66 Countries for the 2011 conference.

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Safety & Quality: Adverse events for clinicians

Runciman WB

2011 ACNP Conference 6th-8th October, Adelaide

2011

Presented at the 2011 Australian College of Nurse Practitioners Conference, "Nurse Practitioners - Coming of Age" held in Adelaide. The 2011 conference brought together nurse practitioners, advance practice nurses, clinical nurse specialists, researchers, educators, policy makers, and managers.

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Is money spent on quality improvement money better spent on clinical care? NO

Runciman WB

Medical Journal of Australia, Volume 194, Issue 12, page 641

2011

Professor Bill Runciman believes much clinical care is inappropriate, and QI can be effective.

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